Combining strong sensibilities of visual communication and marketing, I’ve provided multiple brand and visual identity packages for clients and workplaces for about 20 years.

It’s a skill that was honed throughout college and career through both traditional and digital methods. In many workplaces, I was involved in a push for consistency and credibility for the company or organization’s branding. For me, visual identity always seems to be about listening to the customers’ business fundamentals. Transforming these into visual communication is usually more successful when both parties can agree on a set of ideals that are needed. Later, those offerings can often bloom into various themes and supplemental concepts that enhance a brand or identity.

Virginia Capitol Foundation

A logo that can be printed in full color or grayscale that speaks to the preservation of the Capitol and its Square.

The Virginia Capitol Foundation and Capitol Square Preservation Council were in need of an identity that speaks to the preservation of the Capitol and its Square. The Capitol’s recognizable South Portico was highlighted along with the Dogwood, the Commonwealth’s Official Flower. The theme of the identity continues to grow through the virginiacapitol.gov website, social media and printed materials for the 501-3c and Governor’s Commission.

Virginia General Assembly Websites

A brand for an ever-evolving family of websites belonging to the Virginia General Assembly with both a classical and modern treatment showing the most historic, yet still working Capitol building while accommodating for a very long domain name/web address

A brand created by committee for an ever-evolving family of websites belonging to the Virginia General Assembly with both a classical and modern treatment showing the most historic, yet still working Capitol building in the United States. The mixture of old and new was something that was needed as the website was going through a redesign, needing to show both of these facets. One of the hardest tasks for the committee and myself was coming up with a domain name / web address. There are several rules for .gov domains which made this even more complex. Prior to the resesign, the web address was somewhat cryptic. I think we had success showing the Capitol in a new light while accommodating for a very long domain name/web address that is presented in the logo creatively, without actually being displayed in a long form.

Commonwealth of Virginia House of Delegates Seal

The formal House of Delegates Seal presented in all printed and electronic ephemera for the House of Delegate Clerk's Office and House Membership - Additional art direction by George W. Bishop, IV.

Created the formal House of Delegates Seal presented in all printed and electronic ephemera for the House of Delegate Clerk’s Office and House Membership. The result was a design that relied heavily on the mace of the House of Delegates. This is a sovereign symbol brought out at the beginning of each legislative session by the sergeant-at-arms and is a very important artifact within the House of Delegates Chamber. The other parts of the House seal are divided into quadrants, flanked by Bay Laurel, a roman symbol of victory. Bay Laurel is seen in many murals in the Capitol’s rotunda. The quadrants from left to right illustrate the Roman fasces, an ancient Imperial Roman symbol of power, the ships Susan Constant, Godspeed and Discovery that sailed to Jamestown from England, a portion of the Commonwealth Flag representing “Sic semper tyrannis” with virtue’s foot on the prostrate form of Tyranny, and lastly both the state bird and flower are shown.

Southern Legislative Conference

A marketing logo and identity designed for a large conference of state legislatures held in Williamsburg at the 400th anniversary of Virginia's 1st colony and settlement


Created A marketing logo and identity designed for a large conference of state legislatures held in Williamsburg, Virginia at during the 400th anniversary of Virginia’s 1st colony and settlement at Jamestowne. As seen in the gallery, a variety of print and web content was designed for the conference. Variations on the brand and its accompanying consistent typography made signage and web content recognizable